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August 09, 2011

Deep Vein Thrombosis - A travel killer

DVT : Tips to Avoid the Eisk of the Economy Class Syndrome

Deep Vein Thrombosis Associated with Long Distance Travel

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) may be associated with any form of long distance travel whether by air, car, coach or train but it is often referred to as "economy class syndrome" when it occurs to airline passengers.

The following information provides a brief overview of the problem and advice on how to avoid this risk.

What is deep vein thrombosis?

Deep vein thrombosis is a condition where a thrombus or blood clot forms within a deep vein, typically one in the thigh or the calf. This blood clot can either partially or completely block the flow of blood in the vein. In extreme cases, this clot can break free from a vein wall and travel to the lung and block an artery. This pulmonary embolism(PE) could lead to serious injury or death. In pregnant women, this kind of embolism could lodge in the placenta and put the fetus at risk.

How do you get deep vein thrombosis?

Deep vein thrombosis is a problem that is caused by pooling of blood in the vein, which triggers blood-clotting mechanisms. Anyone who sits for long periods of time in a vehicle, movie theater, or even an office desk may develop clumps of clotted blood in the legs. Airline passengers in coach seating are particularly vulnerable because of the sometimes dense seating and limited ability to get up and move around. However, even passengers in business and first class are at risk. [Full story]

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