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August 09, 2011

Deep Vein Thrombosis - A travel killer

DVT : Tips to Avoid the Eisk of the Economy Class Syndrome

Deep Vein Thrombosis Associated with Long Distance Travel

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) may be associated with any form of long distance travel whether by air, car, coach or train but it is often referred to as "economy class syndrome" when it occurs to airline passengers.

The following information provides a brief overview of the problem and advice on how to avoid this risk.

What is deep vein thrombosis?

Deep vein thrombosis is a condition where a thrombus or blood clot forms within a deep vein, typically one in the thigh or the calf. This blood clot can either partially or completely block the flow of blood in the vein. In extreme cases, this clot can break free from a vein wall and travel to the lung and block an artery. This pulmonary embolism(PE) could lead to serious injury or death. In pregnant women, this kind of embolism could lodge in the placenta and put the fetus at risk.

How do you get deep vein thrombosis?

Deep vein thrombosis is a problem that is caused by pooling of blood in the vein, which triggers blood-clotting mechanisms. Anyone who sits for long periods of time in a vehicle, movie theater, or even an office desk may develop clumps of clotted blood in the legs. Airline passengers in coach seating are particularly vulnerable because of the sometimes dense seating and limited ability to get up and move around. However, even passengers in business and first class are at risk. [Full story]

July 15, 2011

Keep Yourself and Kids Protected from Harmful Sun

Sun Safety at the Beach

Spring break is a great time for the family to get away from the cold, dark days of winter and have some fun in the sun. Keep your family safe while on your trip by following these tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Sun Safety for Babies

  • Babies under 6 months of age should be kept out of direct sunlight. Move your baby to the shade under a tree, umbrella or stroller canopy.

  • Dress babies in lightweight clothing that covers the arms and legs, and use brimmed hats.

    Sun Safety for Kids

  • Choose sunscreen that is made for children, preferably waterproof. Before covering your child, test the sunscreen on your child's back for a reaction. Apply carefully around the eyes, avoiding eyelids. If a rash develops, talk to your pediatrician.

  • Select clothes made of tightly woven fabrics. Cotton clothing is both cool and protective.

  • When using a cap with a bill, make sure the bill is facing forward to shield your child's face. Sunglasses with UV protection are also a good idea for protecting your child's eyes.

  • If your child gets sunburn that results in blistering, pain or fever, contact your pediatrician.

  • [Read full story]

    July 14, 2011

    Car Shoppers Will Compromise on Price, Not Safety

    The tough economy and high gas prices are driving consumers to prioritize fuel economy with their next car purchase according to a new survey by the Consumer Reports National Research Center. And to save at the pump, they are willing to compromise on purchase price, amenities, and size but not safety.

    Taking the pulse of American motorists on car buying and fuel economy issues, the Consumer Reports National Research Center conducted 1,764 random, nationwide telephone interviews of adult car owners from April 28-May 2, 2011.

    The economy has caused a significant drop in annual car sales over recent years, and the age of the average car driven by respondents has increased to eight years. This trend was consistent across most demographics, though household income was a key factor. In households earning $50,000 or more a year, the average age of their cars was six years, whereas lower-income households drove 10-year-old vehicles on average. A significant 23 percent of surveyed motorists are driving cars from the 1990s, many of which must be at the tail end of their reliable service life and certainly well behind current safety standards. [Read full report]

    July 13, 2011

    10 Tips to Keep Your Child Safe When Traveling

    Top 10 Safety Tips for Traveling With Children

    Traveling with children, especially infants or toddlers, puts special demands on the adults responsible for their well-being. Based on analysis of dozens of aviation incidents and accidents involving children and my own experience as a traveling parent, here are ten tips that can make the trip safer for your child.

    1. Plan ahead: Ask yourself what supplies you will need to have on hand to take care of any normal or special needs for the child. Remember, it is the airline's responsibility to carry passengers to their destination, but it is the responsibility of the parent or responsible adult to take care of any children.

    2. Use a child restraint system for children under 40 pounds (18.1 kilos): The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration strongly recommends that children weighing less than 40 pounds be put into a child restraint system appropriate for their weight. Children under the age of two may be carried on the lap of an adult, but the lap child should have some kind of restraint system. For small children, consider the following recommendations:

    • Find a way to conveniently carry any appropriate child restraint systems through airports and into and out of aircraft.

    • If the child is over the age of two, and less than 40 pounds, follow the FAA recommendations for child restraint systems.

    • If the child is under two, consider buying a separate seat for the child and use an appropriate restraint system for the seat.

    • If the child is under two and will be traveling on the lap of an adult, consider using an in-flight child restraint. Also, bring along an appropriate child restraint system just in case the seat next to you happens to be unoccupied.  [Read full article]

    June 24, 2011

    Summer Safety for Teen Travelers

    Teen Summer Travel Safety Tips & Advice

    Tips for Parents & Teens from Industry Veterans

    Whether you are sending your child to a traditional overnight camp, on a school field trip or half way around the world, safety is always paramount in a parent’s mind.  For 20 years a Chicago-based service adventure travel company called The Road Less Traveled has been providing teens and young adults the chance to embark upon unique, life-changing experiences in some of the world’s most incredible locations.  Whether participants are hiking the Andes Mountains in Ecuador or scuba diving and replanting underwater reefs in the Florida Keys, the programs’ first priority is always safety.
     
    To ensure the best and safest journey possible, here are some safety tips for teens and parents from the staff of The Road Less Traveled:
     
    For Parents…

    Choose A Credible Company: With so many teen tours, adventure trips and service-focused programs available to teens these days it can be hard to know which one to go with.  Select a program that has a great track record and an established reputation.  Don’t be afraid to ask for references or testimonials from previous participants.  Another consideration is to choose a program that is accredited by the American Camp Association (ACA). [Read full story]

    June 15, 2011

    Teen Driver Safety Tips

    Teen Driving Safety Tips

    Driving Safety Tips: Teach Your Teen to be a Safe Driver

    Teaching your teen to drive is a big responsibility. These driving safety tips will help you help your teen to be a smart and safe driver.  

    Tip 1. Teen driving safety tip - Eliminate distractions.

    Staying focused while driving can reduce the risk of an accident. Have a discussion with your child about common driving distractions such as cell phones, the radio and passengers. Set rules together about the use of electronics and the number of passengers permitted in the car when he or she is driving.


    Tip 2. Teen driving safety - Wear a seat belt.

    Seat belt use is lower among teenage drivers than any other age group. Make sure your child understands that wearing a seat belt is the best way to be protected in case of an accident. Your teen and any passengers riding in the car must wear a seat belt at all times as required by state teenage driving laws.

    Tip 3. Teen driving safety - Know your state’s teenage driving laws.

    Driving laws differ from state to state. In addition to seat belt laws, they may include a curfew for teens under the age of 18 or a passenger limit.  Check with your local DMV for specific teenage driving laws, and make sure your teen understands the laws and the consequences for breaking them.  [Find More Tips Here]

    June 13, 2011

    Vet Pilot Offers Summer Travel Tips

    Veteran Pilot Offers Summer Travel Tips

    CAPTAIN KAREN KAHN OFFERS TIPS FOR TRIPS
     THIS SUMMER SEASON

    Summer is just around the corner and the thought of a relaxing vacation is on the minds of grounded jet-setters who are itching to get away. Many are already beginning to plan out their summer destinations and this popular travel season is sure to be a busy one yet again. Knowing this better than anyone, seasoned commercial airline pilot Captain Karen Kahn offers several tips to help restless travelers keep their cool at the airport this summer.

    Before Arriving at the Airport:

    •    Pack smartly. Place all your valuables (jewelry, electronics, etc.) in your carry-on luggage. Bags are subject to screening and hand-searches and many airlines are not responsible for lost or damaged items. In addition, place an identification tag on the outside of your laptop as they are the most forgotten item at screening checkpoints.

    •    Know your limits. Don’t forget to place all of your liquids and gels in a quart-size Ziploc bag.  Many stores now offer miniature sized toiletries for this reason.  Additionally, many airlines tack extra fees onto bags that exceed their weight limit rules. Pack only what you need and check with your airline regarding their specific regulations.

    •    Go online. With many airlines you can print boarding passes on their website to skip long waits at the airport.  Some companies also offer text, email or phone notifications regarding your flight so you stay updated on your flight’s status.

    •    Dress: Less is better. Keep in mind all of the airport’s security screening procedures.  If possible avoid items such as belts, hard to remove shoes, hats, and any jewelry that contains metal as removing these items takes unnecessary time that could make the difference between making and missing your flight. [Read More]

    April 12, 2011

    7 Tips for a Safe Trip to Mexico

    7-tips-safe-travel-mexico 
    While the hot sun, blue waves and white sand make Mexico a tropical paradise, many Americans are scratching any plans for a south of the border getaway because of rising concerns over safety.  However, there are still safe ways to visit Mexico for a carefree vacation.

    “You certainly shouldn’t throw caution to the wind, but Manzanillo and many other tourist destinations are still safe places to travel,” says Howard Alper, a property owner in Manzanillo, Mexico.  “The majority of violent crimes are isolated to a few border towns, a thousand miles away.  If the crime rate increased in Los Angeles, would you avoid visiting Chicago?”

    To travel wisely, make sure to pack your common sense with the bathing suit and sunscreen and follow these tips for a safe yet relaxing vacation. [7 Tips Here]

    April 07, 2011

    Motion Skills for Teen Drivers

    Motion Skills 1

    Inspired by Every Parents' Worst Nightmare

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of teen deaths in America, and with all of the distractions teens experience today, the number of accidents is destined to rise. This alarming statistic sparked Kris Rolfson and his wife, Christy Rolfson to do something about this tragic reality, so they set out to create a beacon of hope for parents and teen drivers. Through pure passion and determination, Motion Skills was born.

    Kris Rolfson, CEO and founder of Motion Skills, was inspired by every parent's nightmare, when his son was able to get behind the wheel of his car after only completing a simple multiple choice driving test. Kris realized his son had absolutely no knowledge in regards to driving, beyond having memorized the answers to state laws and basic driving rules. Though his son knew the basic rules of the road, the multiple choice test did not prepare him to handle a multi-ton automobile in traffic on an open road. The main focus for Kris is to save lives by teaching skills that address the most frequent types of accidents today’s teen drivers are involved in. Motion Skills hopes to be another voice of reason that stresses the importance of being able to handle common driving distractions.

    While Kris spent many years as an engineer in San Diego, he always found time to race go-karts and cars, both off-road and motocross. For the past eight years he’s focused teaching in public schools and as a youth minister at his church. His wife Christy has worked in the bio tech industry for the past twenty years. Together, they have two children. Christy noted that “Kris’ years teaching in public school and youth ministry provides the knowledge to connect with teens and to be an effective instructor when it comes to classroom education, comprehension and retention.” [Full Story]

    March 29, 2011

    Emergency Car Kit Must Haves

    Breakdown-header 

    If you’ve never broken down in your car, consider yourself one of the lucky ones. But keep in mind luck has a tendency to run out, usually at the most inopportune times. Winter months and dark country roads seem to be when Lady Luck takes her vacation. Cold weather, road salt and mud, ice and slush can all cause a plethora of surprises, even if you take care of you car. Be prepared.

    The first thing you need to understand and accept is that this can happen to you. Don’t allow yourself to fall into that false sense of security that it won’t because you take your car to the shop for all its maintenance check-ups right on schedule. That’s hogwash. Sure, as long as you keep the car on clean roads in mild weather you can be relatively confident you won’t get stuck. But that’s not reality for most Americans. We’re a nation of active people who go places and do things with our cars.

    Before we get into the list of what to always keep in your trunk or back of your SUV, here are a few scenarios of what can go wrong that might cause you to get stuck and have to wait for help. First, there are the traditional challenges such as flat tires, engine overheating, running out of gas, or an electric failure. You may be able to fix or prevent some of these things yourself; others will require you to wait for help. All will have you stranded by the roadside for at least an hour.

    Next are weather-related problems such as running off the road on slippery roads, an accident, windows too dirty to see through, mud sucked up into your engine, heavy rain, blizzard, tornado; weather that would force you off the road until it passes. Any one of these situations could detain you for hours.

    Most of these things are preventable, however, impossible to predict. Think back into your own driving history or that of someone close to you. Has this happened to you or them? [Full Story]