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September 15, 2011

Free Pocket Ranger App Powered by ParksByNature Network

Pocket Ranger App Powered by ParksbyNature Network

Have you thought about visiting a State Park? These parks are often within 50 miles from home, making it easy for visitors to come and go as they please.

ParksByNature Network is working with the Government to Save the Parks by marrying today’s technology that is often used to navigate through our days by bringing The Sanctioned and Approved Mobile Tour Guide to enhance your visit.

Pocket Ranger™ apps are offered in a “FREE” and “purchasable” Pro-Enhanced version formatted for Apple and Android devices.

These tour guides also translate into a universal mobile website for each participating state park system, making Pocket Ranger extremely accessible for everyone to use. With its innovative features, Pocket Ranger™ enhances a visitor’s experience before, during, and after an outing to a state park.  These guides deliver to users hundreds of maps, real-time location-based weather conditions, park overview, park history, calendar of events, reservations, photo sharing and social networking capability through today’s popular sites.

Did you ever lose child in a park? Well, the Friend/Family Finder feature can help reduce this problem. Users can sync their devices to locate and keep track of one another. Full story

August 04, 2011

How to Keep a Travel Journal

How to Keep a Travel Journal

How to Keep a Travel Journal - Tips for Writing on the Road by Pam Bauer

Looking for fresh travel journal writing ideas? Read on for tips to get you started and ideas for creating a journal you will cherish.

Choosing a Travel Journal

Choose a journal. There are many journals available, from inexpensive spiral notepads to elegant hand-bound volumes. Make sure the journal that you choose is one that you like. This may not seem important – you may think that any journal will do. But travel, along with being exhilarating and fun, can also be intense and demanding, so you want a journal that pleases you, that you want to write in, that invites you to put pen to paper. And since you will carry your journal for the length of your trip, be sure the size is right for you. If you’re packing light and moving frequently, a small, lightweight journal is best. Similarly, if you write prolifically, be sure your journal has enough pages to last until the trip’s end.

Just do it. This may seem obvious, but it needs to be said: write in your journal. Sometimes a traveler with the best of intentions can get stuck at the start. All of those blank pages in a beautiful new journal may seem intimidating, or you think your handwriting is too messy, or your words aren’t good enough. Nonsense! A travel journal is not a scholarly work. It is a record of your experiences – written by you, for you. There are no rules, and no one is grading what you write. The best way to get going is to, well, get going. Dive in, start writing and you’ll find these barriers will disappear. [Full article]

June 28, 2011

7 Common Travel Mistakes - How to Prepare

7 Common Mistakes To Avoid When Traveling

With 17 years experience in the travel business, Ellen Paderson has seen it all. Whether her clients are first-timers going on a Caribbean cruise or veteran world travelers headed for Australia, she has compiled a list of ‘7 Common Travel Mistakes’ from which all travelers can benefit.

(1) Take along your over-the-counter medications – Surprisingly they’re hard to find. If you do find them, they’re very expensive, especially on Caribbean islands. Bring your Dr. and insurance contact info list of prescriptions and RX numbers, Carry meds with you.

(2) Check your Passport expiration
– It cannot expire within 6 months of your return travel date.
(3) Expired passport? Take your confirmed itinerary to the immigration office. They will issue a passport that day if your travel starts within 10 days.

(4) Check your flight schedule the night before you’re scheduled to travel to make sure flights haven’t been changed or cancelled.

(5) Leave enough time between connections -- You need at least 90 minutes to go through Customs, pick up luggage and recheck before going on the next leg of your flight. Note that leaving the U.S., you don’t need to go through Customs, but you do on the way back, re-entering the country.

(6) Notify your bank if you’ll be using a credit or ATM card outside the US. If the bank is not notified, the ATM will keep your card, and your credit card will be declined.
(7) Take comfortable shoes. To quote world travel expert Rick Steves, “Footloose and fancy-free is not so easy if you have the wrong shoes. Now is the time to start breaking in what you plan to wear on your next trip.” Take more than one pair of tested footwear in case one gets wet, torn or lost, or isn’t as comfy as you thought. Do you need hiking boots, walking shoes, or sandals?

[Read full story]

June 21, 2011

Asia's Top 10 Sacred Sites

Asia’s Top Ten Sacred Sites

Temples, Devotees and Rituals Enrich Travel to Asia

From the holy city of Varanasi in India, to the world’s largest Buddhist monument in predominantly Muslim Indonesia, to the Emerald Buddha in Thailand, this divine list of the top ten temples, shrines and places of worship portrays Asia’s most intriguing sacred sites:

1. TAKTSHANG MONASTERY (Bhutan) - Easily Bhutan’s most iconic temple and the country’s most sacred spot, Tigers Nest monastery clings dramatically to a cliff almost 3,000 feet above the Paro Valley floor.  

2. VARANASI (India) - It is said that this holy city for Hindus rests on the trident of Lord Shiva and a ritual cleansing in the holy waters of the Ganges at Varanasi absolves the believer of all sins, enabling a higher birth in the next life. Millions of Hindus make their way here annually and so do travelers from around the world.

3. SHWEDAGON PAGODA (Myanmar/Burma) - Sheathed in gold plates and topped by a 76-carat diamond, the great golden dome that rises 322 feet above its base in Yangon is Burma’s most sacred site, visited by Buddhist worshippers and monks daily. You can perform a clockwise walk around the complex that is believed to have been constructed over 2,500 years ago, praying at various stations, to complete a personal pilgrimage. 

4. DAMBULLA (Sri Lanka) - The most impressive of Sri Lanka’s cave temples, Dambulla is a World Heritage site consisting of five caves with over 6,000 square feet of painted walls and ceilings, creating the largest continuous series of paintings in the world.

[Visit Ful List of All 10 Sacred Sites Here]

June 20, 2011

Essential Insurance Tips for Travel

by Miles Walker

Travel insurance is an essential investment for every traveler. With so many unpredictable factors threatening vacations, business and emergency travel, the small price to pay for such a beneficial accessory is crucial. This post will explain the most essential forms of coverage to purchase before traveling.


Road trips warrant the need for travel insurance, even though they're the most commonly-overlooked type of trip when it comes to travel insurance. There are hundreds of things that could happen while driving, but there are a few very necessary types of insurance to purchase for any road trip.

Medical Coverage

Even when personal medical insurance is available, travel medical insurance is a good investment. For the small price of a premium payment, medical expenses will be covered well, assuming the company sells a solid policy. Make sure emergency care is covered, as well as lost or stolen prescriptions. Many people lose their medication while on vacation. If narcotics are lost and there is no travel insurance, it could be virtually impossible to obtain more. Most personal medical insurance policies have a high deductible for emergency care, especially out of the country. Always be sure that a travel insurance policy has generous medical coverage for both international and domestic travel. Also, the deductible must be affordable. [Read More]

June 15, 2011

Teen Driver Safety Tips

Teen Driving Safety Tips

Driving Safety Tips: Teach Your Teen to be a Safe Driver

Teaching your teen to drive is a big responsibility. These driving safety tips will help you help your teen to be a smart and safe driver.  

Tip 1. Teen driving safety tip - Eliminate distractions.

Staying focused while driving can reduce the risk of an accident. Have a discussion with your child about common driving distractions such as cell phones, the radio and passengers. Set rules together about the use of electronics and the number of passengers permitted in the car when he or she is driving.

Tip 2. Teen driving safety - Wear a seat belt.

Seat belt use is lower among teenage drivers than any other age group. Make sure your child understands that wearing a seat belt is the best way to be protected in case of an accident. Your teen and any passengers riding in the car must wear a seat belt at all times as required by state teenage driving laws.

Tip 3. Teen driving safety - Know your state’s teenage driving laws.

Driving laws differ from state to state. In addition to seat belt laws, they may include a curfew for teens under the age of 18 or a passenger limit.  Check with your local DMV for specific teenage driving laws, and make sure your teen understands the laws and the consequences for breaking them.  [Find More Tips Here]

June 02, 2011

10 Tips to Planning an Active Vacation


It is summer vacation planning time again and knowing how to find and vet the best options is an important step. Following are Ten Tips from a “world’s best” tour operator to take you from research to R&R as you strategize when and where to spend precious vacation time and dollars.

The first bit of advice in choosing the right tour operator is to get everyone involved and as Austin points out, “remember it’s the journey, not the destination that counts.” To help guide the consumer through the maze of vacation options, the tour experts at Austin-Lehman Adventures offer these useful tips ( when starting the trip planning process... [Full Story]

Visit Road & Travel Magazine for thousands of more articles.

May 30, 2011

How to Fly First Class For No More Than Coach

First class Fly first class for no more than coach? Not only is it possible, such fares are available all the time, says Unpublished Airfare Analyst Matthew Bennett. Bennett, also known as "Mr. Upgrade," has launched a web site that posts free and low-cost upgrade deals on dozens of domestic and international "Since first and business class travelers represent less than 20 percent of the total airline passenger market, not much has been done to identify these little-known offers," said Mr. Upgrade. "Our job at is to continually research all those elusive specials. They're available — if you know where to look. If there's a deal out there that will get our subscribers an upgrade, we'll find it."

First Class Flyer's paid subscription service will have you sitting pretty, knowing you booked the best seats and value for your money.

For more air travel advice, visit RTM's Airline Rules Section.

May 27, 2011

Are Your Kids Healthy at Camp?

Healthy_camp_cuisineWorried about what foods your kids will eat when they travel to camp this year? When you went to camp as a kid, you probably didn't serve yourself lunch from a salad bar, but that might just be changing for your children. According to the American Camp Association (ACA), the majority of children's recreation and travel camps now offer not only salad bars, but also fresher foods and healthier cuisine.

Here are 6 new ways camps are keeping your kids healthy:
1. Healthy menu choices
2. Allergen-free foods
3. Special diets
4. Classes in nutrition
5. Awareness of eating disorders
6. Interactive programs

To learn more about these programs and how to find a healthy camp, read RTM's Camp Cuisine Guide.

May 25, 2011

Fuel Saving Vacations for Long Summer Weekends

Fuel_saving_vacationsLooking to escape for a long summer weekend, but worried about fuel prices depleting your pocketbook or the hassle of air travel?  These fuel saving vacation ideas will help you getaway without braking the bank.

Get Away without Leaving Home:
Try visiting local attractions such as the local zoo, parks, museums, traveling carnival, or amusement parks. Splurge on a big meal out at that restaurant you've always wanted to try and take in a play or musical at a local theater. Many people live within a short driving distance of some great attractions, restaurants and entertainment. Contact the tourism office in your area and ask about great attractions you may not know about. Check out RTM's World Travel Directory and Destination Reviews for possible information about your area.

Continue reading "Fuel Saving Vacations for Long Summer Weekends" »